Bullying Relational Aggression elementary counselor

Bullying: A New Series About Relational Aggression

It’s right after lunch and you hear a knock on your door…there’s a group of girls outside office wanting to talk to you about a “friendship problem”. After talking with them you find out that their problem should be filed under “bullying” instead of “friendship”.

Maybe you don’t work in a school setting, maybe you are on the front lines as a parent. You see the pain and hurt your child feels when they are excluded from being part of the group.

Bullying Relational Aggression elementary counselor

According the National Association of School Psychologist, relational aggression is a newer term used to describe the harm within relationships that is caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior.

Regardless of whether you are a parent or professional, relational aggression can have a devastating impact on children and teens.

The topic of relational aggression is huge, much too large to cover in one blog post. Over the course of the next couple weeks, we will be taking an in-depth view into the following areas:

I look forward to us exploring this important topic together! Be sure to bookmark or follow this post/blog to receive updates in the series.

You can also find me on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and (of course) Pintrest.

Series Posts (to date)

Post #2: Relational Aggression: How to Spot Friendship Bullying

Post #3: K-12 Relational Aggression Curriculum 

Post #4: How to End the On-Again Off-Again Friendship Cycle

Comments

4 responses to “Bullying: A New Series About Relational Aggression”

  1. Rick Avatar

    Great stuff, and I’m glad I came across your blog. I’m subscribing so I can keep up. I used some of Trudy Ludwig’s books this year to really hone in on relational aggression with our 2nd-5th graders. Also, there’s a great video by Sesame Street called “The Good Birds’ Club” that I use with our kinders.

    On the flip side, we often have kids go home describing incidents of simple conflict to their parents, and it gets turned into a bullying situation! With that term so prevalent in our media today, it would be nice to have a way of educating both kids and community about what bullying is and how we’re addressing it in the schools.

    1. thehelpfulcounselor Avatar

      I agree with the over use of the term “bullying”. I would say over 50% of the bullying situations I handle are the result of poor conflict management.

  2. Rick Avatar

    Great stuff, and I’m glad I came across your blog. I’m subscribing so I can keep up. I used some of Trudy Ludwig’s books this year to really hone in on relational aggression with our 2nd-5th graders. Also, there’s a great video by Sesame Street called “The Good Birds’ Club” that I use with our kinders.

    On the flip side, we often have kids go home describing incidents of simple conflict to their parents, and it gets turned into a bullying situation! With that term so prevalent in our media today, it would be nice to have a way of educating both kids and community about what bullying is and how we’re addressing it in the schools.

    1. thehelpfulcounselor Avatar

      I agree with the over use of the term “bullying”. I would say over 50% of the bullying situations I handle are the result of poor conflict management.

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